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John F. Kennedy Books

John F. Kennedy Books

Lyndon B. Johnson' 's flawed personality and character traits were formed when he was a child, and -through his primary enablers, his mother and his wife - grew unchecked for the rest of his life as he suffered severe bouts of manic-depressive illness. The people-manipulation skills he learned at his father's side and had perfected by the time he graduated from college became the currency he used to barter, steal and finesse his way through the corridors of power on Capitol Hill. These skills, combined with his overpowering manic personality, amoral instincts and thirst for power, allowed him to prosper both financially and politically during his years in Congress. Neither his family nor his employees, aides, associates and cabinet officials would ever confront him on any issue for which he had made up his mind, including the Vietnam War. Unfortunately, his "darker side" included a lifetime struggle with bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder which he successfully hid from the public, though not all of his aides. It is the premise of this book that Lyndon Johnson suffered recurrent and progressively stronger bouts of mental collapses during the period of his vice presidency as he planned his ascension to the presidency, purposely undermining Kennedy's domestic and foreign policy initiatives for the purpose of cleverly saving them for his own legacy. His active involvement with JFK's assassination will be conclusively shown, including photographic evidence that he knew in advance when and where it would happen. The stunning conclusion of this book is that Lyndon Johnson began planning his takeover-the fulfillment of his life-time dreams-even before being named as the vice presidential nominee in 1960.

"Hear No Evil: Social Constructivism and the Forensic Evidence in the Kennedy Assassination" is a detailed walkthrough of the major scientific evidence in the JFK murder, presenting an analysis which builds toward a powerful presentation of the "acoustics evidence" for which he is well known. Along the way, Thomas delivers a withering critique of many of the government's hand-picked scientific experts, who failed the public trust by failing to follow the evidence. Thomas' book marshalls the evidence for not 3, or 4, but 5 shots in Dealey Plaza, including one from the infamous "Grassy Knoll." But revering no sacred cows, Thomas demolishes myths promulgated by both Warren Commission adherents and conspiracy advocates, and presents a novel and compelling re-interpretation of the “single bullet theory.”

Legacy of Secrecy tells the full story of JFK’s murder and the tragic results of the cover-ups that followed, as revealed by two dozen associates of John and Robert Kennedy, backed by thousands of files at the National Archives. The result of twenty years of research, it finally tells the full story long withheld from Congress and the American people.

A bestselling author and a leading expert on the JFK assassination, Dick Russell (The Man Who Knew Too Much) here compiles a fascinating selection of his latest research into the assassination of our thirty-fifth president. These pieces cover every aspect of the JFK assassination, from the shots, to the subsequent investigation, to the Warren Report. Russell’s research analyzes newly declassified information and continues to build upon his painstakingly detailed investigations. His unrivalled scholarship has created one of the most comprehensive and authoritative examinations of the assassination to date. Russell has come closer than ever to solving the ultimate question: Who killed JFK?

Mexico City was the Casablanca of the Cold War - a hotbed of spies, revolutionaries, and assassins. The CIA's station there was the front line of the United States' fight against international communism, as important for Latin America as Berlin was for Europe. And its undisputed spymaster was Winston Mackinley Scott.Chief of the Mexico City station from 1956 to 1969, Win Scott occupied a key position in the founding generation of the Central Intelligence Agency, but until now he has remained a shadowy figure. Investigative reporter Jefferson Morley traces Scott's remarkable career from his humble origins in rural Alabama to wartime G-man to OSS London operative (and close friend of the notorious Kim Philby), to right-hand man of CIA Director Allen Dulles, to his remarkable reign for more than a decade as virtual proconsul in Mexico.Morley also follows the quest of Win Scott's son Michael to confront the reality of his father's life as a spy. He reveals how Scott ran hundreds of covert espionage operations from his headquarters in the U.S. Embassy while keeping three Mexican presidents on the agency's payroll, participating in the Bay of Pigs fiasco, and, most intriguingly, overseeing the surveillance of Lee Harvey Oswald during his visit to the Mexican capital just weeks before the assassination of President Kennedy.Morley reveals the previously unknown scope of the agency's interest in Oswald in late 1963, identifying for the first time the code names of Scott's surveillance programs that monitored Oswald's movements. He shows that CIA headquarters cut Scott out of the loop of the agency's latest reporting on Oswald before Kennedy was killed. He documents why Scott came to reject a key finding of the Warren Report on the assassination and how his disillusionment with the agency came to worry his longtime friend James Jesus Angleton, legendary chief of CIA counterintelligence. Angleton not only covered up the agency's interest in Oswald but also, after Scott died, absconded with the only copies of his unpublished memoir.Interweaving Win Scott's personal and professional lives, Morley has crafted a real-life thriller of Cold War intrigue - a compelling saga of espionage that uncovers another chapter in the CIA's history.

With deft investigative skill, David Kaiser shows that the events of November 22, 1963, cannot be understood without fully grasping the two larger stories of which they were a part: the U.S. government’s campaign against organized crime, which began in the late 1950s and accelerated dramatically under Robert Kennedy; and the furtive quest of two administrations - along with a cadre of private interest groups - to eliminate Fidel Castro. The seeds of conspiracy go back to the Eisenhower administration, which recruited top mobsters in a series of plots to assassinate the Cuban leader. The CIA created a secretive environment in which illicit networks were allowed to expand in dangerous directions. The agency’s links with the Mafia continued in the Kennedy administration, although the President and his closest advisors - engaged in their own efforts to overthrow Castro - thought this skullduggery had ended. Meanwhile, Cuban exiles, right-wing businessmen, and hard-line anti-Communists established ties with virtually anyone deemed capable of taking out the Cuban premier. Inevitably those ties included the mob. The conspiracy to kill JFK took shape in response to Robert Kennedy’s relentless attacks on organized crime - legal vendettas that often went well beyond the normal practices of law enforcement. Pushed to the wall, mob leaders merely had to look to the networks already in place for a solution. They found it in Lee Harvey Oswald - the ideal character to enact their desperate revenge against the Kennedys. Comprehensive, detailed, and informed by original sources, The Road to Dallas adds surprising new material to every aspect of the case. It brings to light the complete, frequently shocking, story of the JFK assassination and its aftermath.

Praise from a Future Generation is the untold story of the "first-generation critics" of the Warren Report – the U.S. government's official explanation of the assassination of President Kennedy – an explanation that began with the improbable and ended with the impossible. Forty-five years after the assassination of President Kennedy, it seems unlikely that there is much new to say about that tragic event or its aftermath, yet John Kelin's Praise from a Future Generation tells a story that we only thought we knew. Unlike any previous assassination book, Kelin does not argue for the evidence for a conspiracy, or multiple gunmen, or a cover-up, or against the single-bullet theory. All the evidence is here, but it is revealed as Kelin describes in meticulous detail how a small group of ordinary citizens' extraordinary efforts (call it "obsession for the truth") demonstrated to the nation that the JFK assassination simply could not have happened the way the government said it did. In time, the efforts of these "first-generation critics" had an enormous impact on public opinion. Never before has any book focused on the early Warren Commission critics themselves. In this finely written and carefully documented history, John Kelin presents how the evidence came to light since the 1963 assassination of President Kennedy. Here is evidence rarely seen by the public – even by those with an interest in the case – from suppressed photographs that appear to show armed men in the shrubbery of the "grassy knoll" to suppressed testimony by eye-witnesses.

Robert F. Kennedy was the first conspiracy theorist about his brother's murder. In this astonishingly compelling and convincing new account of the Kennedy years, acclaimed journalist David Talbot tells in a riveting, superbly researched narrative why, even on 22 November 1963, RFK had reason to believe that dark forces were at work in Dallas and reveals, for the first time, that he planned to open an investigation into the assassination had he become president in 1968. Brothers also portrays a JFK administration more besieged by internal enemies than has previously been realised, from within the Pentagon, the CIA, the FBI and the mafia. This frightening portrait of sinister elements within and without the government serves as the background for the emotionally charged journey of Robert Kennedy. Reading it, you can absolutely believe any number of people would have been happy for both brothers to meet a sticky end. The tragedy, not just for America but for the world, is that since their murders no one has had the nerve to stand against the dark forces they challenged in quite the same way.

"Someone Would Have Talked" goes beyond proving a conspiracy to murder JFK. Over 14.000 documents, White House diaries, telephone logs, and executive tape recordings detail how the new President managed a cover-up that changed the future of our country. Forty plus years after the murder of President Kennedy, the same intuitive and popular belief exists that was common in the first hours after his assassination – that his murder occurred as the result of a conspiracy. The document releases, transcripts and tapes which have become available in the last decade only serve to confirm how many individuals and witnesses held this belief and expressed it privately but for the most part did not enter the public record. Someone Would Have Talked is supported not only with the normal references and bibliography but also with an extensive library of exhibits and documents. Exhibits range from contemporary newspaper articles through testimony and telephone transcripts to diaries, investigative reports and memoranda.

Who killed JFK? Ever since that fateful day in Dallas, theories about President Kennedy's murder have proliferated, running the gamut from the official "lone gunman" verdict to both serious and utterly screwball conspiracy theories. Michael Kurtz, a distinguished historian who has plumbed every crevice of this controversial case for more than thirty years, now sums up and critiques four decades of debate, while also offering provocative new perspectives. Kurtz presents an objective accounting of what we actually know and don't know about the assassination, underlining both the logic and the limitations of the major theories about the case. He then offers unique interpretations of the physical and forensic evidence and of existing areas of controversy, leading him to new conclusions that readers will find hard to dismiss. Kurtz shows how the official investigation's egregious mishandling of the crime-scene evidence - related to virtually every aspect of the case - is largely responsible for the lone gunman/conspiracy schism that confronts us today. Those responsible for that investigation (including the Dallas police, the FBI, and the Warren Commission) failed so miserably in their efforts that they would have been laughed off the air if they had been portrayed on any of TV's popular CSI series. One of the few experts writing on the subject who actually met Oswald, Kurtz also provides new information about the accused assassin's activities around the time of the assassination and about his double life, analyzing Oswald's ties to the intelligence community, to organized crime, and to both anti- and pro-Castro Cuban activists. Mustering extraordinary documentation - including exclusive interviews with key figures and extensive materials declassified by the Assassination Records Review Board - he both confirms and alters much previous speculation about Oswald and other aspects of the case. Who really killed JFK? Forty years later, most Americans still feel they don't know the truth and that their own government isn't telling them the whole story. This book offers a corrective to even the most recent "final verdicts" and establishes a sound baseline for future research.

That recent appraisal reflects a growing consensus that the Warren Commission largely failed in its duty to our nation. Echoing that sentiment, the Gallup organization has reported that 75 percent of Americans polled do not believe the Commission's major conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald was the "lone assassin." Gerald McKnight now gives profound substance to that view in the most meticulous and devastating dissection of the Commission's work to date. The Warren Commission produced 26 volumes of hearings and exhibits, more than 17,000 pages of testimony, and a 912-page report. Surely a definitive effort. Not at all, McKnight argues. "The Warren Report" itself, he contends, was little more than the capstone to a deceptive and shoddily improvised exercise in public relations designed to "prove" that Oswald had acted alone. McKnight argues that the Commission's own documents and collected testimony - as well as thousands of other items it never saw, refused to see, or actively suppressed - reveal two conspiracies: the still very murky one surrounding the assassination itself and the official one that covered it up. The cover-up actually began, he reveals, within days of Kennedy's death, when President Johnson, FBI Director J Edgar Hoover, and acting Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach all agreed that any official investigation must reach only one conclusion: Oswald was the assassin. While McKnight does not uncover any "smoking gun" that identifies the real conspirators, he nevertheless provides the strongest case yet that the Commission was wrong - and knew it. Oswald might have knowingly or unwittingly been involved, but the Commission's own evidence proves he could not have acted alone. Based on more than a quarter-million pages of government documents and, for the first time ever, the 50,000 file cards in the Dallas FBI's "Special Index," McKnight's book must now be the starting point for future debate on the assassination. It should also inspire readers to echo the "Journal of American History's" praise for his previous book: "McKnight's insistence upon remaining within the bounds of the evidence inspires confidence in his judgment."

"Representing American Events" is edited by series Editors Helena Grice and Tim Woods. This series of textbooks focuses on key events in American history from the perspective of several different disciplines, offering the student a range of disciplinary perspectives on one particular historical event. Books in the series are unique in focusing on one particular event from a range of viewpoints. "The Kennedy Assassination" is written by Peter Knight. It is November 22nd 1963, Dealey Plaza. As a seminal event in late twentieth-century American history, the Kennedy assassination has permeated the American and world consciousness in a wide variety of ways. It has long fascinated American writers, filmmakers and artists, and this book offers an authoritative critical introduction to the way the event has been constructed in a range of discourses. It looks at a variety of historical, political and cultural attempts to understand Kennedy's death. Representations include: journalism from the time; historical accounts and memoirs; official investigations, government reports and sociological inquiries; the huge number of conspiracy-minded interpretations; novels, plays and other works of literature; and the Zapruder footage, photography, avant-garde art, and Hollywood films. Considering the continuities and contradictions in how the event has been represented, the author focuses on how it has been seen through the lens of ideas about conspiracy, celebrity and violence. He also explores how the arguments about exactly what happened on 22 November 1963 have come to serve as a substitute way of debating the significance of Kennedy's legacy and the meaning of the 1960s more generally. The key features are: presents information about the event itself, the cultural context of the period, and the consequences of the event; considers the ways in which the event has been represented in subsequent years in a variety of discourses; and, includes an annotated bibliography and 10 B&W illustrations.

The 1964 murder of a nationally known cancer researcher sets the stage for this gripping exposé of medical professionals enmeshed in covert government operations over the course of three decades. Following a trail of police records, FBI files, cancer statistics, and medical journals, this revealing book presents evidence of a web of medical secret-keeping that began with the handling of evidence in the JFK assassination and continued apace, sweeping doctors into coverups of cancer outbreaks, contaminated polio vaccine, the arrival of the AIDS virus, and biological weapon research using infected monkeys.

A legendary CIA operative and central figure in the Watergate scandal at last tells his story World War II covert agent E. Howard Hunt joined the CIA soon after its inception, becoming one of its most valuable operatives until his retirement in 1970. He blazed a trail for the agency in Latin America, helping to orchestrate the successful 1954 coup in Guatemala as well as the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, which ended in disaster after an ill-fated decision by President John F. Kennedy. During the Nixon administration, he worked with the White House Special Investigations Unit (aka the "plumbers"). In the aftermath of the Pentagon Papers leak, he masterminded the burglary of Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office in 1971, and, with G. Gordon Liddy, he organized the break-in at the Democratic National Committee's Watergate headquarters in 1972. Hunt was ultimately convicted of burglary, conspiracy, and wiretapping and served 33 months in prison. Now in his late eighties, Hunt looks back over his storied career, revealing what really happened and debunking the many rumors that have swirled around him. Writing with his characteristic salty wit, he brings to life his exploits in the CIA, offering surprising revelations about the agency's Latin American operations-and its masterly manipulation of politics and the media in the U.S. He details the "black bag jobs" of the White House plumbers, explains why he agreed to participate in the Watergate burglary-even though he thought it was a bad idea-and sheds new light on the aftermath of the break-in. He sets the record straight on rumors about his first wife's death and accusations that have linked him to the JFK assassination and the George Wallace shooting. And finally, he offers an insider's advice on how the CIA must now reshape itself to regain its edge and help win the war on terrorism. E. Howard Hunt is author of more than 70 suspense novels. Greg Aunapu has reported for Time, People, and a variety of other national news media.

Cuba's number 2 official today — Commander Juan Almeida — was secretly working with JFK in November 1963 to overthrow Fidel. The US government recently revealed Almeida's work for JFK, allowing the updated trade paperback of Ultimate Sacrifice to tell the full story for the first time (complete with new photos and documents). The authors obtained the story from almost two dozen associates of John and Robert Kennedy, starting in 1990 with JFK's Secretary of State Dean Rusk. Their accounts are supported by thousands of newly-released files at the National Archives. Almeida's "palace coup" set for December 1, 1963, was to be backed up by US forces "invited" in by Commander Almeida, then Chief of the Cuban Army. However, three Mafia bosses being targeted by Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy used several CIA assets to infiltrate the secret plot and murder JFK. This resulted in cover-ups by officials like RFK and LBJ, to prevent the exposure of Almeida and a possible nuclear confrontation with the Soviets. The new edition explains why Almeida was not a double agent, why Fidel suspected Almeida's ally Che Guevara, and what Fidel did in 1990 when he finally found out about Almeida's work for JFK.

"Four Days in November" is a narrative of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on 22 November 1963. It is drawn from Vincent Bugliosi's deeply flawed "Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy". I would recommend that anyone who is really interested in this subject to read the much better researched Someone Would Have Talked by Larry Hancock or The Road to Dallas by David Kaiser.

Here is the dramatic story of Detective Richard Cain's criminal career, as revealed by his half-brother. Cain led a double life—one as a well known cop who led raids that landed on the front pages, and the other as a "made man" in one of Chicago's most notorious mafia crime families. Michael Cain weaves together years of research, interviews, family anecdotes, and rare documents to create a comprehensive biography of this complex, articulate, and self-contradictory criminal genius. In a story that reads like the plot of Martin Scorsese's The Departed, Cain played both ends against the middle to become a household name in Chicagoland and a notorious figure in both the Mob and the world of Chicago law enforcement. Eventually murdered in a café by two masked men wielding shotguns, he lived and died in a world of bloodshed and violence. Cain left behind a story so outlandish that he has even been accused of being involved in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Filled with fascinating and until-now unknown facts, The Tangled Web tells the full story of this one-man crime wave.

"JFK and Sam" is a tale of two murders. The first occurred in Dallas in 1963 and the second in Illinois in 1975. The first was ordered by Sam Giancana to avenge his betrayal by the Kennedys. Giancana had assured JFK's win in Illinois with the understanding that the new administration would go easy on the Chicago mob. Instead, Bobby Kennedy stepped up prosecutions. The second assassination was carried out by the CIA and the mob to prevent Giancana from testifying before the Church Committee hearings regarding his role in the CIA's plot to kill Fidel Castro. The irony is that both men were assassinated because of their relationship to each other and events that transpired from that relationship. "JFK and Sam" is unique from other books on the Kennedy assassination. Written by an insider with access to key figures, it names the assassins and traces the assassination team's movements in 1963. The first shot came from the Dal-Tex building (adjacent to the book depository) and struck Kennedy in the back of the neck. The second came from Giancana's driver who fired a CIA prototype handgun with a telescope (called a "fireball") from the grassy knoll, using a frangible bullet, which explains why there was such a massive wound to Kennedy's head. Lee Harvey Oswald was the fall guy and did not fire a weapon.


John F. Kennedy's signed History of Ireland books go up for auction

A six-book set, the History of Ireland, signed by President John F. Kennedy have gone up for auction and has already received bids of over $6k. The complete six-volume set of History of Ireland, by Rev. E. A. Dalton (first edition, 1912) are hardcovered and bound in green cloth with elaborate gilt titling and decoration to spines and front covers.

John F. Kennedy's signature.

The first free end page of each volume is signed in black ink, “John F. Kennedy,” with the lone exception occurring in the sixth volume, which is signed upside-down on the final free end page this distinction suggests that the volume was likely stacked upside-down at the bottom and that Kennedy accidentally signed the book believing it was right-side up.

JFK's signed History of Ireland books.

The consignor affirms that this book set was purchased in Palm Beach, Florida, shortly after Kennedy’s famed ‘Winter White House' was privately sold in June 2020. Given this information, and, moreover, the consistent ‘ownership’ placement of Kennedy’s early full signatures, the auctioneers say they "strongly believe that this six-volume set derives from the personal collection of John F. Kennedy, the first Irish-Catholic to become President of the U.S."

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Kennedy Assassination Books

McMillan, Priscilla J. Marina and Lee: The Tormented Love and Fatal Obsession Behind Lee Harvey Oswald’s Assassination of John F. Kennedy. Hanover, New Hampshire: Steerforth Press, 2013. Print.

Owen, Dean R. November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

Willens, Howard P. History Will Prove Us Right: Inside the Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

Swanson, James L. End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

Sabato, Larry. The Kennedy Half-Century: The Presidency, Assassination, and Lasting Legacy of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

George, Alice L. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: Political Trauma and American Memory. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

Minutaglio, Bill, and Steven L. Davis. Dallas 1963. , 2013. Print.

O’Reilly, Bill, and Martin Dugard. Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot. , 2012. Print.

Janney, Peter. Mary’s Mosaic: The Cia Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and Their Vision for World Peace. New York: Skyhorse Pub, 2012. Print.

McAdams, John. Jfk Assassination Logic: How to Think About Claims of Conspiracy. Washington, D.C: Potomac Books, 2011. Print.

Engdahl, Sylvia. The John F. Kennedy Assassination. Detroit, Mich: Greenhaven Press, 2010. Print.

Robson, David. Kennedy Assassination. San Diego, CA: ReferencePoint Press, 2009. Print.

Kallen, Stuart A. The John F. Kennedy Assassination. Detroit, Mich: Lucent Books, 2009. Print.

Hughes-Wilson, John. An American Coup: The Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. London: Hutchinson, 2008. Print.

Kaiser, David E. The Road to Dallas: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2008. Print.

Kelin, John. Praise from a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report. San Antonio, Tex: Wings Press, 2007. Print.

Bugliosi, Vincent, and Vincent Bugliosi. Four Days in November: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2007. Print.

Piereson, James. Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism. New York: Encounter Books, 2007. Print.

Kelin, John. Praise from a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report. Chicago: Wings Press, 2007. Internet resource.

Talbot, David. Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years. New York: Free Press, 2007. Print.

Knight, Peter. The Kennedy Assassination. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007. Internet resource.

Bugliosi, Vincent. Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2007. Print.

Waldron, Lamar, and Thom Hartmann. Ultimate Sacrifice: John and Robert Kennedy, the Plan for a Coup in Cuba, and the Murder of Jfk. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2005. Print.

Carey, Charles W. The Kennedy Assassination. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2004. Print.

Johnson, Lyndon B, and Max Holland. The Kennedy Assassination Tapes. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004. Print.

40th Anniversary Reprint Edition: John F. Kennedy Memorial Edition Including His Biography and His Most Enduring Words. United States: History Channel, 2003. Print.

McAuliffe, Carolyn. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. San Diego, Calif: Greenhaven Press, 2003. Print.

Connally, Nellie, and Mickey Herskowitz. From Love Field: Our Final Hours with President John F. Kennedy. New York: Rugged Land, 2003. Print.

Kroth, Jerome A. Conspiracy in Camelot: The Complete History of the Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. New York: Algora Pub, 2003. Internet resource.

Armstrong, John. Harvey and Lee: How the Cia Framed Oswald. Arlington, Tex: Quasar, Ltd, 2003. Print.

Rivera, Sheila. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. ABDO Pub: Edina, MN, 2003. Print.

Semple, Robert B. Four Days in November: The Original Coverage of the John F. Kennedy Assassination. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2003. Print.

Mallon, Thomas. Mrs. Paine’s Garage and the Murder of John F. Kennedy. New York: Pantheon Books, 2002. Print.

Fleming, Daniel B. –ask What You Can Do for Your Country: The Memory and Legacy of John F. Kennedy. Clearwater, FL: Vandamere Press, 2002. Print.

Smith, Matthew. Say Goodbye to America: The Sensational and Untold Story Behind the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. Edinburgh: Mainstream Pub, 2001. Print.

Gibson, Donald. The Kennedy Assassination Cover-Up. Commack, NY: Kroshka Books, 2000. Print.

Canal, John A. Silencing the Lone Assassin. St. Paul, Minn: Paragon House, 2000. Print.

H.r. 1553, President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Board Reauthorization Act: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on National Security, International Affairs, and Criminal Justice of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, First Session on H.r. 1553 … June 4, 1997. Washington: U.S. G.P.O, 1998. Print.

John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection. College Park, MD (8601 Adelphi Rd., College Park 20740-6001: National Archives and Records Administration, 1997. Print.

To Amend the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992 to Extend the Authorization of the Assassination Records Review Board Until September 30, 1998: Report (to Accompany H.r. 1553) (including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). Washington, D.C. U.S. G.P.O, 1997. Print.

Newman, John M. Oswald and the Cia. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1995. Print.

The Effectiveness of Public Law 102-526, the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992: Hearing Before the Legislation and National Security Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, November 17, 1993. Washington: U.S. G.P.O, 1994. Print.

Assassination Materials Disclosure Act of 1992: Hearings Before the Legislation and National Security Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, on H.j. Res. 454, to Provide for the Expeditious Disclosure of Records Relevant to the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy, April 28, May 15, and July 22, 1992. Washington: U.S. G.P.O, 1993. Print.

Posner, Gerald L. Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of Jfk. New York: Random House, 1993. Print.

Frewin, Anthony. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: An Annotated Film, Tv, and Videography, 1963-1992. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 1993. Print.

Davis, John H. The Kennedy Contract: The Mafia Plot to Assassinate the President. New York, N.Y: HarperPaperbacks, 1993. Print.

Duffy, James P, and Vincent L. Ricci. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: A Complete Book of Facts. New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1992. Print.

Cavanagh, Suzanne. The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Conspiracy Theories. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 1992. Print.

Livingstone, Harrison E, and Robert J. Groden. High Treason 2: The Great Cover-Up : the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1992. Print.

Assassination Materials Disclosure Act of 1992: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Economic and Commercial Law of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, on H.j. Res. 454, to Provide for the Expeditious Disclosure of Records Relevant to the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy, May 20, 1992. Washington: U.S. G.P.O, 1992. Print.

The Assassination Materials Disclosure Act of 1992: Hearing Before the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, on S.j. Res. 282, to Provide for the Expeditious Disclosure of Records Relevant to the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy, May 12, 1992. Washington: U.S. G.P.O, 1992. Print.

The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992: Report of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, to Accompany S. 3006 to Provide for the Expeditious Disclosure of Records Relevant to the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Washington: U.S. G.P.O, 1992. Print.

Prouty, L F. Jfk: The Cia, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy. New York: Carol Pub. Group, 1992. Print.

Zirbel, Craig I. The Texas Connection: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Scottsdale, Ariz: Texas Connection Co. Publishers, 1991. Print.

Lane, Mark. Plausible Denial: Was the Cia Involved in the Assassination of Jfk?New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1991. Print.

Groden, Robert J, and Harrison E. Livingstone. High Treason: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the New Evidence of Conspiracy. New York: Berkley Books, 1990. Print.

Davis, John H. Mafia Kingfish: Carlos Marcello and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1989. Print.

Groden, Robert J, and Harrison E. Livingstone. High Treason: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy : What Really Happened. New York: Conservatory Press, 1989. Print.

MacNeil, Robert. The Way We Were: 1963, the Year Kennedy Was Shot. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1988. Print.

Hoare, Stephen. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. London: Dryad Press, 1988. Print.

Jovich, John B. Reflections on Jfk’s Assassination: 250 Famous Americans Remember November 22, 1963. Kensington, MD: Woodbine House, 1988. Print.

Scheim, David E. Contract on America: The Mafia Murder of President John F. Kennedy. New York: Shapolsky Publishers, 1988. Print.

Hurt, Henry. Reasonable Doubt: An Investigation into the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1986. Print.

Tagg, Carl F. Fidel Castro and the Kennedy Assassination. , 1985. Print.

Bane, Bernard M. Is President John F. Kennedy Alive and Well?Boston, Mass: BMB Pub. Co, 1981. Print.

Guth, DeLloyd J, and David R. Wrone. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: A Comprehensive Historical and Legal Bibliography, 1963-1979. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 1980. Print.

Lifton, David S. Best Evidence: Disguise and Deception in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: Macmillan, 1980. Print.

Lattimer, John K. Kennedy and Lincoln: Medical and Ballistic Comparisons of Their Assassinations. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980. Print.

Investigation of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Assassinations of the U.s. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off, 1978. Print.

The Investigation of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Performance of the Intelligence Agencies. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off, 1976. Print.

O’Toole, G J. A. The Assassination Tapes: An Electronic Probe into the Murder of John F. Kennedy and the Dallas Coverup. New York: Penthouse Press, 1975. Print.

Canfield, Michael, and Alan J. Weberman. Coup D’état in America: The Cia and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: Third Press, 1975. Print.

Gay, Donovan L. The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: The Warren Commission Report and Subsequent Interest. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 1975. Print.

Wrone, David R. The Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy: An Annotated Bibliography. Madison Wis: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1973. Print.

American Political Assassinations: A Bibliography of Works Published 1963-1970, Related to the Assassination of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Robert F. Kennedy. Washington: distributed by Special Collections Division, Georgetown University Library, 1973. Print.

Lattimer, John. Observations Based on a Review of the Autopsy Photographys, X-Rays, and Related Materials of the Late President John F. Kennedy. Port Washington, N.Y: Resident and Staff Physician and Medical Times, 1972. Print.

Hanson, William H. The Shooting of John F. Kennedy: One Assassin, Three Shots, Three Hits-No Misses. San Antonio, Tex: Naylor Co, 1969. Print.

Bishop, Jim. The Day Kennedy Was Shot. New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1968. Print.

Morin, Relman. Assassination: the Death of President John F. Kennedy. New York: New American Library, 1968. Print.

Lane, Mark. Rush to Judgment: A Critique of the Warren Commission’s Inquiry into the Murders of President John F. Kennedy, Officer J. D. Tippit, and Lee Harvey Oswald. Greenwich, Conn: Fawcett Publications, 1967. Print.

Manchester, William. The Death of a President: November 20-November 25, 1963. New York: Harper & Row, 1967. Print.

Sparrow, John. After the Assassination: a Positive Appraisal of the Warren Report. New York: Chilmark Press, 1967. Print.

Lane, Mark. Rush to Judgment: A Critique of the Warren Commission’s Inquiry into the Murders of President John F. Kennedy, Officer J. D. Tippit, and Lee Harvey Oswald. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1966. Print.

Lane, Mark. Rush to Judgment: A Critique of the Warren Commission’s Inquiry into the Murders of President John F. Kennedy, Officer J.d. Tippit and Lee Harvey Oswald. London: Bodley Head, 1966. Print.

Jones, Penn. Forgive My Grief: A Critical Review of the Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Midlothian, Tex: Printed by the Midlothian mirror, 1966. Print.

Report of the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Washington, D.C: U.S. Govt. Print. Off, 1964. Print.

A Concise Compendium of the Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: Popular Library, 1964. Print.

The Warren Report: Report of the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. New York: Associated Press, 1964. Print.

Four Days: The Historical Record of the Death of President Kennedy. New York: American Heritage Pub. Co, 1964. Print.

Carr, Waggoner. Texas Supplemental Report on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the Serious Wounding of Governor John B. Connally, November 22, 1963. Austin, 1964. Print.

Investigation of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Hearings Before the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Washington, DC: U.S. G.P.O, 1964. Print.

Investigation of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Hearings Before the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy. Washington, D.C: U.S. G.P.O, 1964. Print.

Report of the Warren Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co, 1964. Print.

The Official Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday & Company, 1964. Print.

[john F. Kennedy]: 1917-1963. Indianapolis, Ind: Indianapolis Star, 1963. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and John H. Jenkins. Neither the Fanatics nor the Faint-Hearted: The Tour Leading to the President’s Death and the Two Speeches He Could Not Give. Austin, Tex: Pemberton Press, 1963. Print.

John F. Kennedy Memorial Edition: Including His Biography and His Most Enduring Words : All of Life’s Pictures and Text on the Most Shocking Event of Our Time. Chicago: Time, Inc, 1963. Print.

Files of Evidence Connected with the Investigation of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. S.l: s.n, 1963. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and John H. Jenkins. Neither the Fanatics nor the Faint-Hearted: The Tour Leading to the President’s Death and the Two Speeches He Could Not Give. Austin, Tex: Pemberton Press, 1963. Internet resource.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 1917-1963. Dayton, Ohio: Newsweek, Inc, 1963. Print.


John F. Kennedy: AVery Brief History

Want to learn more about history, but don’t think you have the time? Think again.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy (JFK) was the youngest ever US President when he was elected in 1960, defeating Republican nominee and Vice-President Richard Nixon. JFK was killed by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas in November 1963 Lee Harvey Oswald was charged with the crime, but was himself killed b Want to learn more about history, but don’t think you have the time? Think again.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy (JFK) was the youngest ever US President when he was elected in 1960, defeating Republican nominee and Vice-President Richard Nixon. JFK was killed by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas in November 1963 Lee Harvey Oswald was charged with the crime, but was himself killed by Jack Ruby before he could be brought to trial. As a result, conspiracy theorists have long suggested that others were involved in the assassination. This book tells the story of JFK’s Presidency, overcoming challenges such as the Cuban Missile Crisis and paving the way for huge progress in areas such as civil rights and space exploration.

The Very Brief History series is intended to give the reader a short, concise account of the most important events in world history. Each book provides the reader with the essential facts concerning a particular event or person no distractions, just the essential facts, allowing the reader to master the subject in the shortest time possible. . more


John F. Kennedy

Our youngest elected president, John F. Kennedy left his mark on the presidency, and the nation. This biography guides young readers through his life and era with over 100 black and white illustrations and a timeline. 112 pages, ages 7-11.

Kerry Kennedy, daughter of Robert F. Kennedy, shares personal remembrances of her father and through conversations with politicians, media personalities, celebrities and leaders, explores the influence that he continues to have on the issues at the heart of America's identity.

Robert F. Kennedy staunchly advocated for civil rights, education, justice, and peace his message transcended race, class, and creed, resonating deeply within and across America. He was the leading candidate for the Democratic nomination for the presidency and was expected to run against Republican Richard Nixon in the 1968 presidential election, following in the footsteps of his late brother John. After winning the California presidential primary on June 5, 1968, Robert Kennedy was shot, and he died the following day. He was forty-two.

Fifty years later, Robert Kennedy's passions and concerns and the issues he championed are-for better and worse-still so relevant. RIPPLES OF HOPE explores Kennedy's influence on issues at the heart of America's identity today, including moral courage, economic and social justice, the role of government, international relations, youth, violence, and support for minority groups, among other salient topics.


John F. Kennedy

True or False? When John F. "Jack" Kennedy was very young, his parents decided he could grow up to be the president of the United States.

False! His parents originally intended his older brother, Joe, to grow up to be president. But when Joe died in World War II, they looked to Jack as a possible politician.

When Jack was in the navy in World War II, he led his crew to True or False? When John F. "Jack" Kennedy was very young, his parents decided he could grow up to be the president of the United States.

False! His parents originally intended his older brother, Joe, to grow up to be president. But when Joe died in World War II, they looked to Jack as a possible politician.

When Jack was in the navy in World War II, he led his crew to safety after their boat sank. He was the youngest person ever elected president. During his presidency, he started the Peace Corps, a group that works to help people in other countries.

Read these other History Maker Bios Presidents and Patriots of Our Country

Dwight D. Eisenhower, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Dolley Madison, Paul Revere, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, George Washington . more


Kennedy Biographies Books

Shaw, John. JFK in the Senate: The Pathway to the Presidency. , 2013. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and Martin W. Sandler. The Letters of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Internet resource.

Kennedy, John F, and David B. Frost. John F. Kennedy in Quotations: A Topical Dictionary, with Sources. , 2013. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and Martin W. Sandler. The Letters of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

Kennedy, Caroline. Rose Kennedy’s Family Album: A Family Album from the Fitzgerald Kennedy Private Collection, 1878-1946. , 2013. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and David B. Frost. John F. Kennedy in Quotations: A Topical Dictionary, with Sources. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2013. Internet resource.

Owen, Dean R. November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

Ling, Peter J. John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

Sabato, Larry. The Kennedy Half-Century: The Presidency, Assassination, and Lasting Legacy of John F. Kennedy. , 2013. Print.

George, Alice L. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: Political Trauma and American Memory. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

Brinkley, Alan. John F. Kennedy. , 2012. Internet resource.

Brinkley, Alan. John F. Kennedy. New York: Times Books, 2012. Print.

Clarke, Thurston. Ask Not: The Inauguration of John F. Kennedy and the Speech That Changed America. New York: Penguin Books, 2011. Print.

Onassis, Jacqueline K, Arthur M. Schlesinger, and Michael R. Beschloss. Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy: Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy. New York: Hyperion, 2011. Print.

Matthews, Christopher. Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011. Print.

Meagher, Michael, and Larry D. Gragg. John F. Kennedy: A Biography. Santa Barbara: Greenwood, 2011. Internet resource.

Onassis, Jacqueline K, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Michael R. Beschloss, and Caroline Kennedy. Jacqueline Kennedy: Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy, Interviews with Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., 1964. New York: Hyperion, 2011. Print.

Dallek, Robert. John F. Kennedy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Internet resource.

Rabe, Stephen G. John F. Kennedy: World Leader. Washington, D.C: Potomac Books, 2010. Print.

Golway, Terry. JFK Day by Day : a Chronicle of the 1,036 Days of John F. Kennedy’s Presidency. Philadelphia, PA: Running Press, 2010. Print.

Sorensen, Theodore C. Kennedy. Pymble, NSW: HarperCollins e-books, 2010. Internet resource.

Kennedy, John F, Brian Thomsen, Robert F. Kennedy, and Edward M. Kennedy. The Dream That Will Not Die: Inspiring Words of John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy. New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 2010. Print.

Logsdon, John M. John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Print.

Prouty, L F, and Oliver Stone. JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy. New York, NY: Skyhorse Pub, 2009. Internet resource.

Kennedy, John F. Liberty: The Words and Inspiration of John F. Kennedy. Sydney, N.S.W: Hachette Australia, 2008. Print.

McElrath, Jessica. The Everything John F. Kennedy Book: Relive the History, Romance, and Tragedy of America’s Camelot. Avon, Mass: Adams Media, 2008. Print.

Kelin, John. Praise from a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report. San Antonio, Tex: Wings Press, 2007. Print.

Talbot, David. Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years. New York: Free Press, 2007. Print.

Pitts, David. Jack & Lem: John F. Kennedy and Lem Billings : the Untold Story of an Extraordinary Friendship. New York: Carroll & Graf, 2007. Print.

Bugliosi, Vincent. Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2007. Print.

Heymann, C D. American Legacy: The Story of John & Caroline Kennedy. New York: Atria Books, 2007. Print.

Bryant, Nick. The Bystander: John F. Kennedy and the Struggle for Black Equality. New York: Basic Books, 2006. Print.

Jenkins, Gareth. The John F. Kennedy Handbook. London: MQ Publications, 2006. Print.

Dallek, Robert, and Terry Golway. Let Every Nation Know: John F. Kennedy in His Own Words. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks MediaFusion, 2006. Print.

O’Brien, Michael. John F. Kennedy: A Biography. New York: Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2005. Print.

Kennedy, John F, Eric Freedman, and Edward Hoffman. John F. Kennedy in His Own Words. New York: Citadel Press, 2005. Print.

Gould, Lewis L. Documentary History of the John F. Kennedy Presidency. Bethesda, MD: LexisNexis, 2005. Print.

Cardona, Castro F.-L, and Manuel Giménez. John F. Kennedy. London: Edimat Books, Ltd, 2004. Print.

Smith, Sally B. Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House. New York: Random House, 2004. Print.

Watson, Robert P, and Tom Lansford. John F. Kennedy. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2004. Print.

Carty, Thomas. A Catholic in the White House?: Religion, Politics, and John F. Kennedy’s Presidential Campaign. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Print.

Johnson, Lyndon B, and Max Holland. The Kennedy Assassination Tapes. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004. Print.

Dallek, Robert. John F. Kennedy: An Unfinished Life, 1917-1963. London: Penguin, 2004. Print.

Preble, Christopher A. John F. Kennedy and the Missile Gap. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2004. Print.

40th Anniversary Reprint Edition: John F. Kennedy Memorial Edition Including His Biography and His Most Enduring Words. United States: History Channel, 2003. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and Bill Adler. The Uncommon Wisdom of Jfk: A Portrait in His Own Words. New York: Rugged Land, 2003. Print.

McAuliffe, Carolyn. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. San Diego, Calif: Greenhaven Press, 2003. Print.

Connally, Nellie, and Mickey Herskowitz. From Love Field: Our Final Hours with President John F. Kennedy. New York: Rugged Land, 2003. Print.

Dallek, Robert. An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963. Boston: Little, Brown, and Co, 2003. Print.

Kroth, Jerome A. Conspiracy in Camelot: The Complete History of the Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. New York: Algora Pub, 2003. Internet resource.

Milton, Joyce. John F. Kennedy. New York: DK Pub, 2003. Print.

Semple, Robert B. Four Days in November: The Original Coverage of the John F. Kennedy Assassination. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2003. Print.

Dherbier, Yann-Brice, and Pierre-Henri Verlhac. John Fitzgerald Kennedy: A Life in Pictures. London: Phaidon, 2003. Print.

Ballard, Robert D, and Michael H. Morgan. Collision with History: The Search for John F. Kennedy’s Pt 109. Washington, D.C: National Geographic Society, 2002. Print.

Fleming, Daniel B. –Ask What You Can Do for Your Country: The Memory and Legacy of John F. Kennedy. Clearwater, FL: Vandamere Press, 2002. Print.

Schlesinger, Arthur M. A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Leamer, Laurence. The Kennedy Men: 1901-1963 : the Laws of the Father. New York: Wm. Morrow, 2001. Print.

Naftali, Timothy J, Philip Zelikow, and Ernest R. May. John F. Kennedy: The Great Crises. New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2001. Print.

Swisher, Clarice. John F. Kennedy. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press, 2000. Print.

Wilson, Mike. John F. Kennedy. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1998. Print.

Galbraith, John K, and James Goodman. Letters to Kennedy. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1998. Print.

Hellmann, John. The Kennedy Obsession: The Myth of John F. Kennedy in Twentieth-Century America. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. Print.

Salinger, Pierre. John F. Kennedy, Commander in Chief: A Profile in Leadership. New York, N.Y: Penguin Studio, 1997. Print.

Hellmann, John. The Kennedy Obsession: The American Myth of Jfk. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. Print.

Brogan, Hugh. Kennedy. London: Longman, 1996. Print.

Klein, Edward. All Too Human: The Love Story of Jack and Jackie Kennedy. New York: Pocket Books, 1996. Print.

Matthews, Christopher. Kennedy & Nixon: The Rivalry That Shaped Postwar America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. Print.

Kennedy, John F. Prelude to Leadership: The European Diary of John F. Kennedy, Summer 1945. Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 1995. Print.

Goldman, Martin S. John F. Kennedy, Portrait of a President. New York: Facts on File, 1995. Print.

Reeves, Richard. President Kennedy: Profile of Power. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993. Print.

Reeves, Thomas C. A Question of Character: A Life of John F. Kennedy. New York: Free Press, 1991. Print.

Beschloss, Michael R. The Crisis Years: Kennedy and Khrushchev, 1960-1963. New York, NY: Edward Burlingame Books, 1991. Print.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1991. Print.

John F. Kennedy. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1991. Print.

Reeves, Thomas C. John F. Kennedy: The Man, the Politician, the President. Malabar, Fla: R.E. Krieger, 1990. Print.

Davis, John H. Mafia Kingfish: Carlos Marcello and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1989. Print.

Burner, David. John F. Kennedy and a New Generation. Boston: Little, Brown, 1988. Print.

Kennedy, Robert F, Edwin O. Guthman, and Jeffrey Shulman. Robert Kennedy, in His Own Words: The Unpublished Recollections of the Kennedy Years. Toronto: Bantam, 1988. Print.

Lifton, David S. Best Evidence: Disguise and Deception in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1988. Print.

Anderson, Lois E. John F. Kennedy. New York: Gallery Books, 1986. Print.

Davis, John H. The Kennedy Clan: Dynasty and Disaster, 1848-1983. London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1985. Print.

Manchester, William. One Brief Shining Moment: Remembering Kennedy. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983. Print.

Parmet, Herbert S. JFK, the Presidency of John F. Kennedy. New York: Dial Press, 1983. Print.

Gadney, Reg. Kennedy. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1983. Print.

Martin, Ralph G. A Hero for Our Time: An Intimate Story of the Kennedy Years. New York: Macmillan, 1983. Print.

Kennedy, John F. President Kennedy and the Press. Frederick, Md: University Publications of America, 1981. Print.

Parmet, Herbert S. Jack: The Struggles of John F. Kennedy. New York: Dial Press, 1980. Print.

Paper, Lewis J. John F. Kennedy: The Promise & the Performance. New York: Da Capo Press, 1980. Print.

Longford, Frank P. Kennedy. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1976. Print.

Miroff, Bruce. Pragmatic Illusions: The Presidential Politics of John F. Kennedy. New York: McKay, 1976. Print.

Paper, Lewis J. The Promise and the Performance: The Leadership of John F. Kennedy. New York: Crown Publishers, 1975. Print.

O’Toole, G J. A. The Assassination Tapes: An Electronic Probe into the Murder of John F. Kennedy and the Dallas Coverup. New York: Penthouse Press, 1975. Print.

Canfield, Michael, and Alan J. Weberman. Coup D’état in America: The Cia and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. New York: Third Press, 1975. Print.

Bradlee, Benjamin C, and John F. Kennedy. Conversations with Kennedy. New York: Norton, 1975. Print.

Schwab, Peter, and J L. Shneidman. John F. Kennedy. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1974. Print.

O’Donnell, Kenneth P, and David F. Powers. Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye: Memories of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Boston: Little, Brown, 1972. Print.

Benjamin, Philip. John F. Kennedy. New York: New Dimensions, 1970. Print.

Koch, Thilo. Fighters for a New World: John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Robert F. Kennedy. New York: Putnam, 1969. Print.

Sorensen, Theodore C. The Kennedy Legacy. New York: Macmillan, 1969. Print.

Hanson, William H. The Shooting of John F. Kennedy: One Assassin, Three Shots, Three Hits-No Misses. San Antonio, Tex: Naylor Co, 1969. Print.

Bishop, Jim. The Day Kennedy Was Shot. New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1968. Print.

Morin, Relman. Assassination: the Death of President John F. Kennedy. New York: New American Library, 1968. Print.

Frank, Elke. John F. Kennedy. Berlin: Colloquium Verlag, 1968. Print.

Duhême, Jacqueline. John F. Kennedy: A Book of Paintings. New York: Atheneum, 1967. Print.

Ions, Edmund S. The Politics of John F. Kennedy. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1967. Print.

Damore, Leo. The Cape Cod Years of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice-Hall, 1967. Print.

Reidy, John P. The True Story of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, U.s. President. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1967. Print.

Manchester, William. Portrait of a President: John F. Kennedy in Profile. Boston: Little, Brown, 1967. Print.

Reidy, John P. John F. Kennedy. Chicago, IL: Childrens Press, 1967. Print.

Fuchs, Lawrence H. John F. Kennedy and American Catholicism. New York: Meredith Press, 1967. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and Bill Adler. The Complete Kennedy Wit. New York: Citadel Press, 1967. Print.

Hawthorne, Manning. John F. Kennedy. Ahmedabad: Harold Laski Institute of Political Science, 1967. Print.

Salinger, Pierre. With Kennedy. Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday, 1966. Print.

Lane, Mark. Rush to Judgment: A Critique of the Warren Commission’s Inquiry into the Murders of President John F. Kennedy, Officer J. D. Tippit, and Lee Harvey Oswald. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1966. Print.

Donald, Aïda D. P. John F. Kennedy and the New Frontier. New York: Hill and Wang, 1966. Print.

Hennessy, Maurice N. I’ll Come Back in the Springtime: John F. Kennedy and the Irish. New York: I. Washburn, 1966. Print.

Sorensen, Theodore C. Kennedy. New York: Harper & Row, 1965. Print.

Lincoln, Evelyn. My Twelve Years with John F. Kennedy. New York: D. McKay Co, 1965. Print.

Burns, Joan S, Goddard Lieberson, and Ira Teichberg. John Fitzgerald Kennedy. New York: Atheneum, 1965. Print.

Artus, O M. President John F. Kennedy in Germany: Präsident John F. Kennedy in Deutschland. New York: American Council on Germany, 1965. Print.

Shepard, Tazewell. John F. Kennedy: Man of the Sea. New York: W. Morrow, 1965. Print.

Burns, Joan S, Goddard Lieberson, and Ira Teichberg. John Fitzgerald Kennedy As We Remember Him. New York: Atheneum, 1965. Print.

Schlesinger, Arthur M. A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co, 1965. Print.

Sidey, Hugh. John F, Kennedy: Portrait of a President. London: A. Deutsch, 1964. Print.

Memorial Addresses in the Congress of the United States and Tributes in Eulogy of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Late a President of the United States. Washington, [D.C.: U.S. Govt. Print. Off, 1964. Print.

Levine, I E. Young Man in the White House: John Fitzgerald Kennedy. New York: Messner, 1964. Print.

Report of the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Washington, D.C: U.S. Govt. Print. Off, 1964. Print.

Salinger, Pierre, and Sander Vanocur. A Tribute to John F. Kennedy. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1964. Print.

A John F. Kennedy Memorial. New York, 1964. Print.

Kennedy, John F, Wesley Pedersen, and Bernard Quint. Legacy of a President: The Memorable Words of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Washington, D.C. U.S. Information Agency, 1964. Print.

Faber, Harold, and Jacques Lowe. The Kennedy Years. New York: Viking Press, 1964. Print.

Kennedy, John F, and Gerald Gardner. The Shining Moments: The Words and Moods of John F. Kennedy. Montreal: Pocket Books, 1964. Print.

Report of the Warren Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co, 1964. Print.

The Official Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday & Company, 1964. Print.

John F. Kennedy Memorial Edition: Including His Biography and His Most Enduring Words : All of Life’s Pictures and Text on the Most Shocking Event of Our Time. Chicago: Time, Inc, 1963. Print.

Sidey, Hugh. John F. Kennedy, President. New York: Atheneum, 1963. Print.

Markmann, Charles L, and Mark Sherwin. John F. Kennedy: a Sense of Purpose. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1961. Print.

Donovan, Robert J. Pt 109: John F. Kennedy in World War II. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1961. Print.

Lowe, Jacques. Portrait: The Emergence of John F. Kennedy. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1961. Print.

Dinneen, Joseph F. The Kennedy Family. Boston: Little, Brown, 1960. Print.

Burns, James M. G. John Kennedy: A Political Profile. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1960. Print.


Fast Facts about John F. Kennedy

The following information about John F. Kennedy is arranged alphabetically by topic. For more information please contact [email protected] Have a research question? Ask an Archivist.

Airport, New York City: The law changing the name of Idlewild International Airport to John F. Kennedy International Airport was signed by New York Mayor Robert Wagner on Wednesday, December 18, 1963. A dedication ceremony was held on Tuesday, December 24, 1963 at 11:00 AM. See the New York Times article of December 19, 1963, p. 25.

Appointment Books, General Information: The White House appointment books were kept by Evelyn Lincoln, the President's secretary, and recorded his workday appointments and activities. The Kennedy administration White House appointment books are by no means the complete record of the President's activities that such books tend to be for modern presidents.

Assassination:

  • November 22, 1963
  • Dallas, Texas (Dealy Plaza)
  • 12:30 p.m., CST (time approx.)
  • Pronounced dead at Parkland Hospital 1:00 p.m., CST
  • First press report by UPI 12:34 p.m. CST

Back Brace: Markings on the brace that President Kennedy wore indicate that it came from the Washington, D.C. firm of Nelson Kloman Surgical Supply Company.

Baseball: During his school years, John F. Kennedy played baseball as a pitcher (right-handed) and third baseman. John F. Kennedy threw out the opening day pitch for the Washington Senators, who were playing the Baltimore Orioles, on April 8, 1963.

Birth: May 29, 1917. John F. Kennedy was born in the master bedroom on the second floor of 83 Beals Street, Brookline, Massachusetts.

  • The Manitou:
    • Length: 62 feet overall (44 feet on water line). Beam: 13 feet. Draft: 9 feet.
    • Power: gasoline engine (7-8 knots).
    • Equipment: radio direction finder, fathometer, radio telephone.
    • Accommodations: icebox, propane stove, usable fireplace, head forward, and head admidships. Sleeps 3 crew forward, 4 in main cabin and the main stateroom aft sleeps 2.
    • Marconi rigged yawl.
    • Requires at least 3 experiened hands to sail her and another 2 or 3 to handle the sails and gear.
    • In addition to regular working sails, has a complete set of racing sails.
    • Designed for off-shore sailing with comfortable accommodations.
    • Donated in 1955 to the Coast Guard Academy.
    • Built in 1947 by M. M. Davis and Son in Solomans, Maryland for the James Lowes of Chicago.
    • Named after Manitou Passage in Lake Michigan. "Manitou" means "Spirit of the Water."
    • Chosen by President Kennedy in 1962: "floating White House."
    • Sold by government (Defense Surplus Sales Office) on May 23, 1968 to the Harry Lundeberg School of Seamanship at Piney Point, Maryland for $35,000. Used for training the Merchant Marine.
    • Length: 92' 3"
    • Beam: 16' 6"
    • Draft: 4' 10"
    • Cruising Speed: 12 knots
    • Weight: 88 tons
    • Built: 1931 by Defoe Boat Works in Bay City, Michigan
    • Owned by the Kennedy family from 1952 to 1970.
    • Length: 52'. Beam: 12'. Draft: 3.5'.
    • Commissioned by Edsel Ford.
    • Designed by Boston naval architect Walter J. McInnis and constructed by F. D. Lawley of Quincy, Massachusetts in 1930.
    • Rum-runner hull configuration and two Sterling Dolphin six-cylinder 300hp engines allow speeds of thirty knots and more.
    • Built of double plank mahogany with wide hull and varnished superstructure.
    • Open cockpit forward measuring 9' x 10'.
    • Combination galley and crew's quarters aft of the forward cockpit.
    • Originally designed with open bridge and powered by Chrysler Royal 3 cylinder marine engine.
    • Special equipment: fathometer and ship-to-shore radio.
    • Classed as an outboard runabout.
    • 17' in length, 5' beam.
    • Cruising speed 35 mph.
    • Built by Kenway Boat Co., of Saco, Maine.
    • Purchased by Joseph P. Kennedy in July 1960 as a birthday gift for Jacqueline Kennedy.
    • Powered by a 75hp Evinrude outboard motor.
    • A one-design International Star Class boat No. 902.
    • Built in 1930, it was sold to John F. Kennedy and his brother Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. in 1934. After Joseph was killed in 1944, the boat was sold to a sailor in Maine.
    • Wiano Senior Class Sloop, 25' long 8' wide, 3500 lbs
    • Built by Crosby Boatyards, Osterville, MA in 1932.

    Books, Favorites as Child (Rose Kennedy Personal Papers, "Modern Times: Memorials, grandchildren, etc. and the future")

    • Arabian Nights
    • Billy Whiskers series
    • Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
    • Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
    • A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson
    • King Arthur and the Round Table by A.M. Hadfield
    • Lays of Ancient Rome by Thomas Macauley
    • The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
    • Kim by Rudyard Kipling
    • Bambi by Felix Salten
    • Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
    • Peter Pan by J.M. Barrier
    • Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
    • Story of a Bad Boy by Thomas B. Aldrich
    • Wing and Wing by James Fenimore Cooper
    • Biography of a Grizzly by Ernest T. Seton
    • At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald
    • Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan
    • Wonder Tales From East and West, Introduction by Maud Wilder Goodwin

    Books, Favorites as President (White House Central Subject Files, Box 722, "PP 15-5: Preferences and hobbies, Books-Authors-Poetry-Prose-Fiction")

    • Lord Melbourne by David Cecil
    • Montrose by John Buchan
    • Marlborough by Sir Winston Churchill
    • John Quincy Adams by Samuel Flagg Bemis
    • The Emergence of Lincoln by Allan Nevins
    • The Price of Union by Herbert Agar
    • John C. Calhoun by Margaret L. Coit
    • Talleyrand by Duff Cooper
    • Byron in Italy by Peter Quennell
    • The Red and the Black by M. de Stendhal
    • From Russia With Love by Ian Fleming
    • Pilgrim's Way by John Buchan

    Boy Scouts: The President was a Boy Scout in Troop 2 for two years in Bronxville, New York. He was also active in the Boston Council from 1946 to 1955: as District Vice Chairman, Member of the Executive Board for more than four years, Vice President for one year, and National Council Representative for two years. He was Honorary President of the National organization of the Boy Scouts of America in 1961.

    Campaign 1946: On April 25, 1946, John F. Kennedy entered the race for the 11th Congressional District seat, which was being given up by James Michael Curley. The District comprised Boston wards 1, 2, 3, and 22 Cambridge and Somerville wards 1, 2, and 3.

    Campaign 1952: Announced his candidacy on April 6, 1952.

    Car: 1959 Pontiac Convertible Coupe. Vehicle Identification/Engine #859F-1111.

    Cigars: John F. Kennedy smoked 4-5 a day. His preference was for Upmanns or Monticellos. (White House Central Subject Files, Box 722, "PP 15: Preferences and Hobbies, General")

    Confirmation Name: Francis

    Doodles: From 1952 until the President's death, Mrs. Evelyn Lincoln, his personal secretary, accumulated and catalogued these materials. Most of the doodles are part of the Personal Papers of John F. Kennedy and further information can be found in the finding aid of that collection.

    Election 1960: Announced his candidacy January 2, 1960 in Washington, DC.

    Schedule of debates:

    • First Debate, 9/26/60: Originated from CBS in Chicago and was carried by all networks. Watched by an estimated 70,000,000 people.
    • Second Debate, 10/7/60: Originated from NBC in Washington, D.C. carried by all networks.
      Third Debate, 10/13/60: Entitled "Face-to-Face, Nixon-Kennedy" originated ABC Hollywood (Nixon) and New York (John F. Kennedy) carried by all networks.
    • Fourth Debate, 10/21/60: Originated from ABC New York carried by all networks.
    • Quotations:
      • "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." (Edmund Burke)
      • From One Man's America, by Alistair Cooke: On the 19th of May, 1780, as Mr. Cooke describes it, in Hartford, Connecticut, the skies at noon turned from blue to gray and by mid-afternoon had blackened over so densely that, in that religious age, men fell on their knees and begged a final blessing before the end came. The Connecticut House of Representatives was in session. And as some men fell down in the darkened chamber and others clamored for an immediate adjournment, the Speaker of the House, one Colonel Daveport, came to his feet. And he silenced the din with these words: "The Day of Judgment is either approaching or it is not. If it is not, there is no cause for adjournment. If it is, I choose to be found doing my duty. I wish, therefore, that candles may be brought."
      • From Dante's Inferno.
      • George A. Barnum (Coast Guard)
      • Hubert Clark (Navy)
      • Timothy F. Cheek (Marines)
      • Richard E. Gaudreau (Air Force)
      • Samuel R. Bird (Army, commanding)
      • James L. Felder (Army)
      • Douglas A. Mayfield (Army)
      • Larry B. Smith (Navy)
      • Jerry J. Diamond (Marines)

      Godfather: Thomas A. Fitzgerald (maternal uncle)

      Godmother: Loretta Connelly (aunt)

      Harvard Years:

      • Address 1939-40: Winthrop House F 14
      • Field of Concentration: Government
      • Graduation Date: June 20, 1940, S. B. cum Laude

      Height: 6' 1"

      "High Hopes" Campaign Song: Sung by Frank Sinatra to the tune of his 1959 hit single, "High Hopes," but with lyrics changed in support of the 1960 Democratic presidential candidate.

      Inaugural Address: Fewer than 1900 words (the shortest since 1905), between 16-17 minutes long.

      Inaugural Poem (Robert Frost): "The Gift Outright." Frost had composed a longer poem, "For John F. Kennedy His Inauguration," but was apparently unable to see his text in the mid-day glare and recited the older poem instead.

      Inauguration:

      • Oath: Administered by Chief Justice Earl Warren
      • Bible held by Clerk of the Supreme Court James Browning, later a Federal Appellate Judge in the 9th district with offices in San Francisco
      • See the Boston Globe, Saturday, January 21, 1961 for a story on the family's children during the inaugural.

      Legislation:

      • First bill signed into law: (PL 87-3) an act restoring military rank to former President Eisenhower. Signed 3/22/61.
      • Last bill signed into law: (PL 88-185) authorizing the striking of medals to commemorate the founding of the first union health center of the ILGWU. Signed 11/20/63. passed during Kennedy years are contained in the publication Summary of the Three-year Kennedy Record and Digest of Major Accomplishments of the Eighty-seventh Congress and the Eighty-eighth Congress, United States Congress.

      License: #53332D

      License Plate: As Senator: MA-1995

      Limousine, Presidential: 1961 Lincoln Continental Presidential Limousine "X-100" in "metalic navy blue." Equipped with two jump seats, the car could seat six adults. The blue interior had mouton carpeting on the floor, a wool broadcloth roof interior and all leather seats. Storage space for machine guns under the front seat and in the trunk compartment. Rear seat power operated and rose approximately ten and one half inches, putting the President in full view. Contained foot stands for the President's feet. Accessories: two flagstaffs (one on each front fender), two flashing type red lights located just above the front bumper, a siren, two spotlights for the flags on the fender, a two way radio telephone, an A-M radio and speaker in the rear compartment, a floodlight to illuminate the rear seat, lap robes incorporating the Presidential Seal, grab handles, a first aid kit, emergency light fire extinguisher. A continental rear tire arrangement at the rear held the spare tire. On either side of the tire was a stand for secret service men, as well as toward the front and rear on each side.

      Movies: The following are some of the movies that John F. Kennedy saw during his presidency:

      • Spartacus, February 3, 1961
      • The World of Apu, February 16, 1961
      • One-Eyed Jack, March 30, 1961
      • All in a Night's Work, April 2, 1961
      • Draft number information: While at Stanford in 1940, John F. Kennedy registered for the draft. Thirteen days later Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, blindfolded, reached into the ten-gallon "fishbowl" and began drawing numbers for the draft lottery. On the eighteenth draw he pulled out number 2748, Kennedy's. As a college student, however, he was able to defer until July of 1941.
      • Separation information: Serial # 116071/1109
      • Medals and awards:
      • Navy and Marine Corps Medal
      • Purple Heart Medal
      • American Defense Service Medal
      • American Campaign Medal (LST-449 P19-1)
      • Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (with 3 bronze stars) (PT-59 P24-4)
      • World War II Victory Medal PT-109 P21-1

      Officials of the Kennedy Administration: January 20, 1961 - November 22, 1963.

      Oval Office: Listing of items in the office and on the desk.

      Pets in the White House: Two parakeets: Bluebell and Maybell three dogs: Charlie, Pushinka and Clipper and two ponies: Macaroni and Tex. Complete list of pets.

      Portraits: The portraits of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline B. Kennedy hanging in the White House were painted by Aaron Shikler.

      Presidential Medal of Freedom (Papers of John F. Kennedy. Presidential Papers. President's Office Files. Subjects. Medal of Honor, Medal of Freedom)

      • P.T. 109 was built by the Elco Naval Division of the Electric Post Company in Bayonne, N.J. It was delivered to the Navy on July 10, 1942. Fitting was completed at the New York Naval Shipyard. Lieutenant John F. Kennedy took command of P.T. 109 on April 24, 1942. He was the third commander of the ship. It was cut in two by the Japanese destroyer Amagari on 8/2/43.
      • Words on Coconut: Lieutenant Kennedy sent a message by way of friendly islanders who had found him and his men after their shipwreck. The message was composed of these words carved into the skin of a coconut: NAURO ISL. COMMANDER. NATIVE KNOWS POS'IT. HE CAN PILOT. 11ALIVE. NEED SMALL BOAT. KENNEDY.

      Reading Speed: John F. Kennedy could read 1,200 words a minute. In 1954-1955 he attended meetings at the Foundation for Better Reading in Baltimore.

      Senate Office: Room #362 Senate Office Building

      Social Security Number: 026-22-3747

      Sunglasses: Two pairs of glasses with tortoise shell frame, one with inscriptions "American Optical" and "True color Polaroid tc74-51" and the other with "Cabana TS 2505."


      An Unfinished Life: John F Kennedy Robert Dallek (2003)

      In the just-published My Autobiography, Alex Ferguson reveals himself to be an obsessive collector of books about JFK and cites this volume as his favourite. This is one of the ex-Man Utd boss’s sounder judgments: walking 40 years behind the cortege, Dallek is able to avoid most of the sentimentality and family interference that hobbled earlier biographers. Frank about the subject’s sexual appetites and health (which would probably have killed him if Oswald hadn’t), the book also judiciously assesses the administration’s political achievements.


      Two Days in June : John F. Kennedy and the 48 Hours that Made History

      On two consecutive days in June 1963, in two lyrical speeches, John F. Kennedy pivots dramatically and boldly on the two greatest issues of his time: nuclear arms and civil rights. In language unheard in lily white, Cold War America, he appeals to Americans to see both the Russians and the "Negroes" as human beings. His speech on June 10 leads to the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963 his speech on June 11 to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Based on new material -- hours of recently uncovered documentary film shot in the White House and the Justice Department, fresh interviews, and a rediscovered draft speech -- Two Days in June captures Kennedy at the high noon of his presidency in startling, granular detail which biographer Sally Bedell Smith calls "a seamless and riveting narrative, beautifully written, weaving together the consequential and the quotidian, with verve and authority." Moment by moment, JFK's feverish forty-eight hours unspools in cinematic clarity as he addresses "peace and freedom." In the tick-tock of the American presidency, we see Kennedy facing down George Wallace over the integration of the University of Alabama, talking obsessively about sex and politics at a dinner party in Georgetown, recoiling at a newspaper photograph of a burning monk in Saigon, planning a secret diplomatic mission to Indonesia, and reeling from the midnight murder of Medgar Evers.
      There were 1,036 days in the presidency of John F. Kennedy. This is the story of two of them.

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