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Gudgeon II SS-567 - History

Gudgeon II SS-567 - History



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Gudgeon II SS-567

Gudgeon II

(SS-567: dp. 1,560; 1. 269'2"; b. 27'2"; dr. 17'; s. 15.5 k;
cpl. 83; a 821" tt.; cl. Tang)

The second Gudgeon, was launched by the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, N.H, 11 June 1952, sponsored by Mrs. Robert A. Bonin, widow of the first Gudgeon's last commanding officer; and commissioned 21 November 1962, Comdr. Robert M. Carroll in command.

After builders' trials, Gudgeon sailed for Pearl Harbor, where she joined SubRon 1, SubDiv 1, 18 JUlD 1953. Local operations and training exercises continued until 11 April 1954, when Gudgeon sailed to the mainland for ASW exercises along the Washington coast. A Mare Island overhaul occupied the remainder of the year, and Gudgeon returned to Pearl Harbor 9 March 1955. She sailed 21 July 1955, for the first of five WestPac tours, visiting Yokosuka, Formosa, Hong Kong, Manila, and Guam before returning to Pearl Harbor 30 January 1956. Local operations out of the Hawaiian port, overhaul, special secret operations, and a second trip to the West Coast took Gudgeon through the next 18 months.

Sailing from Pearl Harbor 8 July 1957, Gudgeon began a history-making cruise around the world, making the Pacific Fleet Submarine Force's flagship the first American submarine to circumnavigate the globe. After exercises at Yokosuka, Gudgeon sailed west 26 August 1957. As she made her way around the world for the next 6 months, the submarine docked at Asian, African and European ports before a triumphal entry into Pearl Harbor 21 February 1958, 8 months and 25,000 miles since taking departure.

After extensive overhaul, Gudgeon again settled into the peacetime local and special operations, training exercises, and ASW activities. Three WestPac cruises, in 1959, 1961, and 1963, took her to Japan for exercises with the 7th Fleet as well ns to Subic Bay and Hong Kong for liberty. The alternate years, 1960 and 1962, saw Gudgeon heading back to the mainland, where she trained and exercised along the Washington and çalifornia coasts.

Gudgeon returned from the Far East to Pearl Harbor 1 August 1963, and for the next 2 years operated in Hawaiian waters. She departed Pearl Harbor 29 November and arrived San Francisco 9 December for overhaul at Mare Island. The ship was cut in half and an 18 foot section was added during a conversion which gave the submafine new and larger engines as well as much other improved modern equipment. Modernization was completed in April 1967 and Gudgeon returned to duty in the Pacific Fleet.


USS Gudgeon (SS-211)

Armed with the pride borne of her successes on eleven previous war patrols, GUDGEON, under Lt. Cdr. R. A. Bonin, sailed from Pearl Harbor on 4 April 1944 to conduct her twelfth patrol in an open sea area in the northern Marianas. She left Johnston Island on 7 April 1944, after having topped off with fuel, and was never heard from again.

Originally scheduled to leave her area on 16 May, she was ordered on 11 May to depart her area in time to take station for a special assignment. An acknowledgement for this message was required and when none was received, it was asked for again on 12 May. On 14 May, her special assignment was given to another submarine, and GUDGEON was told to return to Midway. She should have arrived at Midway about 23 May but failed to do so and on 7 June she was reported as presumed lost.

GUDGEON's area was the space from 17° N to 21° N, and 143° E to 147° E but if she arrived earlier than 22 April 1944, she was to patrol the rectangle from 21° N to 24° N, 143° E, to 147° E until that time. Using normal cruising speed, she would have arrived in the area assigned about 16 April. Assuming that nothing irregular happened enroute, she might be expected to have been in the northern area from 16-22 April. On 18 April, enemy planes claimed that they dropped bombs on a submarine. "The first bomb hit a bow, the second bomb direct on bridge. The center of the submarine burst open and oil pillars rose." The position given for this attack is 166 miles bearing 13 degrees T [Editor's note: This is more likely to have been 130 degrees T] from "Yuoh" Island. No island approaching the spelling or sound of this word can be found in the Pacific, and it is assumed that a mistake has been made either by the Japanese or in translation of the position. [Editor's note: In all probability, this refers to 硫黄島 (Iō-tō), commonly known to English speakers as Iwo Jima.] If the island referred to could be Maug, the position given would be in the middle of the area in which GUDGEON should have been at the time specified. The attack described cannot be correlated with any known attack on a U. S. submarine near this time, but it is felt that the possible errors in assuming that this attack sank GUDGEON are too great to list as anything but a possibility.

On 12 May 1944, a number of submarines patroling the Marianas reported that the enemy engaged in intensive anti-submarine tactics at about 15° 15' N, 145° 30' E. Early in the afternoon, SANDLANCE states, "while patrolling off Saipan looking for convoy, we heard about forty depth charges eight to ten miles away." Later SANDLANCE received three bombs and twenty-one depth charges herself. SILVERSIDES heard both the first attack and the attack made on SANDLANCE. TUNNY heard depth charging during the afternoon. No submarine returning from the area reported having been attacked on 12 May except SANDLANCE. Japanese data for the attack gives little information save that it was made by planes in cooperation with ships. With so many submarines in the vicinity, and the enemy conscious of their presence, as they undoubtedly were, the attack which was not on SANDLANCE might easily have been on a false contact.

The probability as to the cause for GUDGEON's loss is that she was depth-charged, bombed, or both. The attack of 12 May occurred slightly south of GUDGEON's area, but it was not unusual for submarines to leave their areas temporarily for tactical reasons. Since the anti-submarine measures in the Marianas were so intense, it is not unlikely that GUDGEON would be unable to transmit a receipt for the message of 10 May for several days. All of these conclusions are presumptive, and there is a great likelihood that GUDGEON was lost during an unrecorded enemy attack.

Google Earth image of possible loss location of USS Gudgeon

During her first eleven patrols, GUDGEON was a most active submarine. She sank 25 ships, for 166,400 tons, and damaged 8 more, for 41,900 tons. She started for the Empire but four days after the attack at Pearl Harbor, and there sank a freighter and a submarine. By sinking the Japanese submarine I-73 [Editor's note: corrected from I-173] on 27 January 1942, GUDGEON became the first United States submarine in history to sink an enemy combatant ship. She patrolled the South China Sea in her second war run and sank a large freighter-transport and a medium freighter. Her third patrol was as a member of the forces fighting the Battle of Midway. She inflicted no damage in the battle. Passing from Pearl Harbor to Fremantle, Western Australia for her fourth patrol, GUDGEON patrolled the Truk area enroute. Here she sank three freighters and a freighter-transport, all of fairly large size. Her fifth patrol was in the Bismarck Archipelago, and resulted in the sinking of three freighters and damage to another.

GUDGEON patrolled Davao Gulf, Ambon Island and Timor Island on her sixth patrol. She made no attacks on this patrol, but did reconnoiter the latter two islands. In the Java Sea and Strait of Makassar on her seventh patrol, GUDGEON sank two tankers and two freighters and damaged a third freighter. Her eighth patrol covered a passage from Fremantle to Pearl Harbor with principal patrol in the Philippine areas. She sank the largest (17,500 ton) transport ship the Japanese had, a small freighter-transport, a trawler, and damaged a freighter. GUDGEON patrolled Saipan and Rota on her ninth run, and sank a freighter and damaged another freighter and patrol craft. The East China Sea north of Formosa was GUDGEON's area during her tenth war patrol. She sank a large transport, a small freighter, and the coastal defense vessel WAKAMIYA on 23 November 1943. She also damaged a large tanker. In the same area for her eleventh patrol, this vessel sank a large transport and a sampan, and damaged a second sampan. GUDGEON was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for the period covering her first eight patrols.

See also Ed Howard's Final Patrol page on USS Gudgeon (external link).

The Los Angeles Pasadena Base of the USSVI is the officially recognized custodian of the National Submarine Memorial, West.


Service record

After builders' trials, Gudgeon sailed for Pearl Harbor, where she joined Submarine Squadron 1 (SubRon 1), Submarine Division 1 (SubDiv 1), 18 July 1953. Local operations and training exercises continued until 11 April 1954, when Gudgeon sailed to the mainland for antisubmarine warfare (ASW) exercises along the Washington coast. A Mare Island Naval Shipyard overhaul occupied the remainder of the year, and Gudgeon returned to Pearl Harbor 9 March 1955. She sailed 21 Jul 1955, for the first of five WestPac tours, visiting Yokosuka, Formosa, Hong Kong, Manila, and Guam before returning to Pearl Harbor on 30 January 1956. Local operations out of the Hawaiian port, overhaul, special secret operations, and a second trip to the West Coast took Gudgeon through the next 18 months.

Sailing from Pearl Harbor on 8 July 1957, Gudgeon began a history-making cruise around the world, making the Pacific Fleet Submarine Force's flagship the first American submarine to circumnavigate the globe. After exercises at Yokosuka, Gudgeon sailed west 26 August 1957. As she made her way around the world for the next six months, the submarine docked at Asian, African and European ports before a triumphal entry into Pearl Harbor 21 February 1958, eight months and 25,000 miles (40,000 km) since taking departure.


Gudgeon II SS-567 - History

There are numerous sights and sounds unique to these submarines that will be lost forever when these last two boats are retired. For security reasons, very little color film has been created of the interior operations of these boats, and almost no sound recordings. During 2003/2004, we requested and received permission to document these historic boats.

With the generous cooperation of the Turkish Navy, in January of 2004, volunteers Carl Nolte and Rich Pekelney visited Turkey to document the historic boats. We were given unprecedented access to the boats, including the opportunity to take photographs and video. All the photos and video were subjected to security review by the Navy, none was deleted or modified.

We are very thankful to the Turkish Navy. Everyone we worked with exceeded all reasonable expectations at every step of the process. The level of cooperation was extraordinary. The high level of professionalism, skill and spirit of the officers and crew was matched only by their hospitality, flexibility and "can do" attitude. The fine material condition of these 50+ year old vessels is a testament to the care they have received from there crews and shipyards.

Both submarines are used primarily for special operations missions, they are also used for mining. The spirit of the crew, the "soul" of the boat is as strong now as ever. The crews of both boats feel their 50+ year old boats are well suited to their missions. We learned during the visit that Hizirries is expecting orders for decommissioning sometime very soon. We experienced the passion her crew has for her when they expressed their opinion that she should get new batteries and be kept operational for another 10 years.


Gudgeon II SS-567 - History

From: Dictionary of American Fighting Ships

A species of small fresh-water minnow.

(SS - 567: dp. 1,560 l. 269'2" b. 27'2" dr. 17' s. 15.5 k. cpl. 83 a 8 21" tt. cl. Tang )

The second Gudgeon , was launched by the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, N.H, 11 June 1952 sponsored by Mrs. Robert A. Bonin, widow of the first Gudgeon's last commanding officer and commissioned 21 November 1952, Comdr. Robert M. Carroll in command.

After builders' trials, Gudgeon sailed for Pearl Harbor, where she joined SubRon 1, SubDiv 1, 18 July 1953. Local operations and training exercises continued until 11 April 1954, when Gudgeon sailed to the mainland for ASW exercises along the Washington coast. A Mare Island overhaul occupied the remainder of the year, and Gudgeon returned to Pearl Harbor 9 March 1955. She sailed 21 July 1955, for the first of five WestPac tours, visiting Yokosuka, Formosa, Hong Kong, Manila, and Guam before returning to Pearl Harbor 30 January 1956. Local operations out of the Hawaiian port, overhaul, special secret operations, and a second trip to the West Coast took Gudgeon through the next 18 months.

Sailing from Pearl Harbor 8 July 1957, Gudgeon began a history-making cruise around the world, making the Pacific Fleet Submarine Force's flagship the first American submarine to circumnavigate the globe. After exercises at Yokosuka, Gudgeon sailed west 26 August 1957. As she made her way around the world for the next 6 months, the submarine docked at Asian, African and European ports before a triumphal entry into Pearl Harbor 21 February 1958, 8 months and 25,000 miles since taking departure.

After extensive overhaul, Gudgeon again settled into the peacetime local and special operations, training exercises, and ASW activities. Three WestPac cruises, in 1959, 1961, and 1963, took her to Japan for exercises with the 7th Fleet as well as to Subic Bay and Hong Kong for liberty. The alternate years, 1960 and 1962, saw Gudgeon heading back to the mainland, where she trained and exercised along the Washington and California coasts.

Gudgeon returned from the Far East to Pearl Harbor 1 August 1963, and for the next 2 years operated in Hawaiian waters. She departed Pearl Harbor 29 November and arrived San Francisco 9 December for overhaul at Mare Island. The ship was cut in half and an 18 foot section was added during a conversion which gave the submarine new and larger engines as well as much other improved modern equipment. Modernization was completed in April 1967 and Gudgeon returned to duty in the Pacific Fleet.


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Gudgeon (SS 567). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 62 crew members registered for the USS Gudgeon (SS 567).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1973 | 1974 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Lockett, GeoffSTS2 SSMay 21, 1974 &ndash Aug 8, 1977Deck1 WestPac, 2 yard periods (Long Beach and Bremerton. Conducted research off San Clement Island. Good boat and good crew.
Kelley, DouglasTM2Feb 1975 &ndash Oct 1975 I picked up the Boat at Subic, and finished the West Pac. I reenlisted 7 months later and retruned to Subic, what a time. I retired as a NCC, always wanted to return to San Diego, and do a West Pac but never made it. DBF!!
Peppers, WilliamFTG1976 &ndash 1980Torpedo Fire Control
Johnson, BobSS-567Aug 19, 1976 &ndashOC
Snyder, Frank (Chipster)FR E-3Mar 1977 &ndash Sep 1978Seaman gang most of the time.I had a great time on Gudgeion, I came from the USS Sargo SSN 583 stationed in Pearl Harbor. Just got off a WESPAC before being transfered to Gudgeion. Hope all our shipmates are doing well,
Hoeltje, PaulMM3(SS)1978 &ndash 1981"M"
Addington, DavidQM2Jan 6, 1978 &ndash Aug 15, 1979
Merkelbach, TomIC3Jun 1978 &ndash Nov 1981ICJUST SAYING HELLO '
Haisan, Gregmm3/ss1979 &ndash 1982Engine roomJust wanted to say hi
Walz, RonPetty Officer Second Class, Interior Communications ElectricianAug 1979 &ndash Dec 1982ElectricalBeen a long time since I contacted any one from the old crew so I thought I would reach out because I ran into Steve Wilson (Electrician) in The Cities (WA). Brought back a lot of great memories.
Dewees, FrankEM2/SSSep 3, 1979 &ndash Sep 3, 1982ElectricalWe're all looking for Greg Haison. Where the heck you been?
Atchley, RayET1/SSSep 15, 1979 &ndash Jun 9, 1982ETWoW, was quite surprised to find this site, To all the old crew members I hope you are doing well.
Cousins, CuzMM31980 &ndash 1983A Gang
Clark, RobertMM/3SSJan 1980 &ndash Sep 1983EnginemanHi guys, I was part of the decommissioning crew.
Sinsel, BrianMM3/SSJan 20, 1980 &ndash Oct 15, 1981 Worked with Zuk, Honez, Clark and Haison. !st Boat great time
Christensen, ScottMMFN/SS1981 &ndash 1983 just to say hi to all my old friends
Staples, RickRM2/SS1981 &ndash 1983RadioHey Guys, I was on the Decommissioning crew also. Had alot of fun onboard here. Where I learned about work hard and play harder.
Mull, Don (Karl)FTGsn/su1981 &ndash 1981WeaponsThe Puking Helmsman. Had a fun trip to canada. Loved the biolumenesense (spelin and punkushayshun) during night watch. What ever happened to James Bond?
Hooper, RobertRM3/SSNov 1981 &ndash Mar 1983Radio
Jones, ChristopherSTSSN/SSDec 1981 &ndash Sep 30, 1983Deck Div/Sonar DivShout out to all my shipmates that sailed on the Gudg with me. Best time of my life. Great introduction to being a submariner. So proud to be a Diesel Boat Sailor.

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1973 | 1974 &ndash now


Gudgeon II SS-567 - History


(SitNews) Ketchikan, Alaska - Some 850 men and women from Ketchikan took part in military service in World War II. Six died in the war and five were buried with honors, either in Ketchikan or at military cemeteries elsewhere. But one "local" man who died in World War II, Jerome Richard Rice, isn't buried anywhere.

Jerome Rice was lost with 59 other crew members on the submarine USS Gudgeon when it disappeared in the western Pacific in 1944.

Jerome Richard Rice
Awarded Purple Heart - World War II
Petty Officer Third Class
Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
USS Gudgeon (SS-211)
Missing in action, Lost at sea
July 30, 1923 - April 18, 1944

That Rice never returned home is not usual in the submarine fleet. The mortality rate in the 30,000 men of the American "silent service" in World War II was 20 percent. The overall mortality rate for soldiers and sailors in that war was 2.5 percent. It was worse if you were a submariner for one of the countries that came on out on the wrong end of the score. For example, of the 40,000 men who served on German U-Boats, only 10,000 survived, a staggering loss of 75 percent.

But even if American submariner losses were lower, anyone who signed up for US sub duty - and it was all volunteer - knew they had a much greater chance of not coming home than other sailors in the war.

And if Rice had survived the war, would he have returned to Ketchikan? Well, the historical record on him is limited. It's not even clear if Ketchikan was his long-term home. His father, Maurice Rice, was a lieutenant commander at the Ketchikan Coast Guard base from 1941 to 1945, so the Navy considers Jerome Rice's hometown to be Ketchikan.

According to the 1930 census, Rice was born in New York. According to the 1940 census, he was living, with his family, in Cleveland. But by 1944, his father was clearly in Ketchikan and - as far as the United States Navy is concerned - Rice is one of the six Ketchikan men who died during service in World War ll.

The length of Rice's service on the USS Gudgeon is also unclear. All we know for sure is that Rice was on the ship when it disappeared in 1944. During the war, it was normal for submariners to do at least three "patrols" on a ship before cycling into a shore side duty. Since the Gudgeon underwent major overall and brought on an entirely new crew before its ninth patrol, it was likely that he was on the ship for its 9th, 10th, 11th and final patrols.

While Rice's own history has been a challenge to trace, the Gudgeon, one of the most honored ships in the war, has a clear history. The Gudgeon is credited with being the first American submarine to sink an enemy warship in World War II on January 27, 1942. The long-range Tambor-class sub scored 14 confirmed kills of 71,000 tons, making it 15th in terms of US subs during the war before it disappeared in early June of 1944 and was presumed lost.

It was built at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo, California, some 25 miles northeast of San Francisco in the upper reaches of San Pablo Bay.

During her three-year war career, Gudgeon sank 14 ships totaling over 71,372 tons, placing her 15th on the honor roll of American submarines. For her first seven war patrols Gudgeon received the Presidential Unit Citation and she earned 11 battle stars for World War II service.
Photo U.S. Navy

Construction began in November of 1939 and it was launched in late January of 1941, nearly a year before Pearl Harbor. The 307-foot submarine had a crew of 6 officers and 64 enlisted men. It had a speed of slightly more than 20 knots on the surface and approximately 8.75 knots submerged. At 10 knots it had a surface range of 11,000 nautical miles. It could stay submerged up to 48 hours. It carried a total of 24 torpedoes and had six forward tubes and four aft tubes. The overall cost of the submarine was $6 million.

The Gudgeon's first mission was to visit Alaska on its way to Pearl Harbor. First , it undertook a shakedown cruise off California and then on August 28, 1941 headed to Seattle and then further north. It was part of a mission to assess Alaskan ports for their suitability as naval bases and along the way it stopped in Sitka, Kodiak and Dutch Harbor. It reached Pearl Harbor in early October where it underwent training exercises.

On December 7, 1941, it was out of the base when it was attacked, in Lahaina Roads near Maui. It immediately returned to Pearl Harbor. Four days later it left Hawaii on the first submarine patrol of the newly declared World War II. Three weeks later it was the first US submarine to reach Japan patrolling for a month off the island of Kyushu. On January 27, 1942 while it was preparing to return to the Pearl Harbor, it encountered the Japanese submarine 1-73 and sank it with three torpedoes.

From February 22 to April 15, the Gudgeon returned to east Asian waters where is sank an unknown freighter and then the 6,500-ton Nissho Maru near Kuman Island. She returned to Pearl Harbor for drydock but left early to participate in the Battle of Midway. She returned to Pearl Harbor in mid-June.

It's third patrol began on July 11th. It sank the 4800-ton transport Naniwa Maru off Truck on August 3 before heading to Australia in early September.

On its fifth patrol it sank the 6700-ton Choko Maru near Rabaul on October 21.

During its 6th patrol, from December 1942 to February 1943, it was involved in two important missions, landing several men in the Philippines to carry out guerrilla missions and rescuing 28 shipwrecked sailors from Timor Island and taking them the Australia.

The Gudgeon continued to be based out of Australia. It's seventh patrol in March and April of 1943, netted two more Japanese ships, the 5400-ton Meigen Marun in the Java Sea and the 9900-ton Toho Maru in the Makassar Strait. The Gudgeon seriously damaged but did not sink three other ships.

On her eight patrol, a return from Australia to Pearl Harbor, the Gudgeon had three more confirmed kills, First, it sank the Kamakura Maru, a 17,000-ton former ocean liner converted into a troop ship near the Philippines. The it sank the 500-ton Naku Maru and the 5800-ton Sumatra Maru. The submarine returned to Pearl Harbor and then traveled to San Francisco for a major overhaul. Mostof the crew was swapped out at this point and here it is likely that Rice joined the ship as a torpedoman third class.

On board the submarines it the torpedoman's job to keep the armaments in top shape according to an 2015 interview in the New York State Military Museum with Charley Carson, a torpedoman third class, who served on the USS Redfish during World War II. Carson said that torpedomen underwent basic training and then 16 weeks of submarine training, followed by 16 weeks of torpedoman training. They were tasked with making sure the torpedoes and the propulsion systems were always in fighting form and that the deck machine gun and the small arms were ready if need be. He said one of the biggest challenges was getting the propulsion systems on the torpedoes to work properly and that in the early stages of the war those systems failed up to 40 percent of the time. Making it more complicated was that the Navy was trying to switch over from alcohol-based torpedo engines to electric ones and the electric ones failed at an even higher rate.

Carson also noted that torpedomen slept in bunks right next to the torpedoes that were stored on the ship.

With a new crew on board, the Gudgeon left Pearl Harbor on its ninth patrol on Sept. 1, 1943, patrolling the Marianas Islands. It had another confirmed sinking in the 3100-ton Taian Maru. It's 10th patrol from October to December took it to the China coast, where it sank the 870-ton Wakamiya and the 6,700-ton Nekka Maru.

On its eleventh patrol, it was able to hit a damaged Japanese aircraft on Feb. 2, 1944 but did not sink it. On Feb. 11 it sank the 3000-ton Satsuma Maru and a smaller Japanese fishing boat off Wenchow, China. The submarine returned to Pearl Harbor in early March of 1944.

The Gudgeon left Pearl Harbor for the last time on April 4, 1944. It stopped at Johnston Island on April 7 for additional fuel and that was the last time it was seen or heard from. A month later, June 7, it was declared overdue and presumed lost. There have been at least two different conjectures about its fate. One story has it being sunk on the 18th near Iwo Jima. Another posits it was attacked and sunk near the Maug Island in the Northern Marianas.

Mike Ostlund's uncle Bill was a lieutenant on the Gudgeon and disappeared with the rest of the crew in 1944. In 2006, Ostlund wrote "Find Em, Chase 'Em, Sink 'Em: The Mysterious Loss of the WWII Submarine USS Gudgeon." Ostlund extensively researched the story of the ship, talking to numerous surviving crew members, who had left the ship before its final patrol.

He also researched Imperial Japanese war records, including a report from a Japanese pilot that had reported sinking an American submarine near "Yuoh" Island on April 18, 1944.

The pilot reported that a submarine had been seen on the surface the day before and he was ordered to be on the look-out. Shortly after dawn, he saw a submarine surface and he bombed it. The first bomb exploded on the bow and the second exploded on the conning tower bridge and the submarine quickly sank, He gave the location as 160 miles from Yuoh Island, according to the translation of the report. US officials have long disregarded that report, according to Ostlund, because there is no "Yuoh" Island anywhere in the Pacific.

But Ostlund believes there was a translation error and the Yuoh actually is Iwo, as in Iwo Jima, as both Yuoh and Iwo are Japanese word for Sulpher, which is another name for Iwo Jima, Sulpher Island.

Ostlund believes that the final resting place for the Gudgeon and her crew - including erstwhile Ketchikan 'resident' Jerome Rice - is in some 4,000 feet of water in the vicinity of Iwo Jima.


1/350 Blue Ridge Models USS Gudgeon SS-567 Tang Class Submarine

The SSN-567 USS Gudgeon, Tang Class Submarine, kit includes everything you would expect a submarine model to include. The kit includes a solid resin hull, resin parts sprues, photo-etch set produced specific for the Tang Class Subs, round brass rod for use in making periscopes, ultra fine rigging line (for rigging PE stanchions to make safety lines), Decal names and numbers for the Tang Class subs, and full color printed instructions. Also included is a CD-ROM (for use in a computer) with Hi-Res pictures of the Tang Class, a digital copy of the instructions and a short history of the Tangs. Each kit is carefully packed in a die-cut foam insert inside of a sturdy box with full color cover art so you can be sure that you are receiving the best kit possible!

REVIEWS:
In Box Reviews:

The included CD is no longer included with this kit. However, you can Click here to see the CD that was included in the first production run of these kits.


Today In History: Feb. 21

Today's Highlight in History: On Feb. 21, 1916, the World War I Battle of Verdun began in France as German forces attacked the French were able to prevail after 10 months of fighting.

On this date

In 1437, James I, King of Scots, was assassinated his 6-year-old son succeeded him as James II.

In 1958, the USS Gudgeon (SS-567) became the first American submarine to complete a round-the-world cruise, eight months after departing from Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

In 1965, black Muslim leader and civil rights activist Malcolm X, 39, was shot to death inside Harlem's Audubon Ballroom in New York by assassins identified as members of the Nation of Islam. (Three men were convicted of murder and imprisoned all were eventually paroled.)

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon began his historic visit to China as he and his wife, Pat, arrived in Beijing.

In 1975, former Attorney General John N. Mitchell and former White House aides H.R. Haldeman and John D. Ehrlichman were sentenced to 2 ½ to 8 years prison for their roles in the Watergate cover-up (both ended up serving a year-and-a-half).

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush endorsed the takeover of shipping operations at six major U.S. seaports by a state-owned business in the United Arab Emirates, and pledged to veto any bill Congress might approve to block the agreement.

Five years ago: Deep cracks opened in Moammar Gadhafi's regime, with Libyan government officials at home and abroad resigning, air force pilots defecting and a major government building ablaze after clashes in the capital of Tripoli.

One year ago: U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter made his international debut with a visit to Afghanistan to see American troops and commanders, meet with Afghan leaders and assess whether U.S. withdrawal plans were too risky to Afghan security.

Today's Birthdays: Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe is 92. Film/music company executive David Geffen is 73. Actor Anthony Daniels is 70. Tricia Nixon Cox is 70. Former Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, R-Maine, is 69. Actor Kelsey Grammer is 61. Country singer Mary Chapin Carpenter is 58. Actor William Baldwin is 53. Actress Jennifer Love Hewitt is 37. Singer Charlotte Church is 30. Actress Ellen Page is 29.

Thought for Today: "There is nothing more horrifying than stupidity in action." — Adlai E. Stevenson, American politician and diplomat (1900-1965).


Gudgeon II SS-567 - History

The Tang was the first submarine designed for underwater performance rather than surfaced speed and handling. Key features included streamlining the outer hull, replacing the conning tower with a sail, installing new propellers designed for submerged operations, installing more air conditioning and a snorkel mast, and doubling the battery capacity.

The German Type XXI diesel submarine revolutionized submarine design with its introduction in 1945. Fortunately, the war was nearing its end and very few of these boats were able to operate against the Allies. Following the war, the US analyzed the captured U-2513 and U-3008 while the Soviet Union took fifteen of these submarines for research. While American fleet submarines could range 30 miles submerged at 3 knots, the German Type XXI submarines could maintain 6 knots for 40 hours, ranging 240 miles and it could do so more quietly than the American submarines and could operate at 650 feet. Equipped with a snorkel, they could range 10,000 miles at 12 knots.

A formal review of US submarine experience during World War II by Commodore Merrill Comstock led to a new submarine design that began in February 1946. It would include a new streamlined mast, retractable gear, and had no deck guns (which increased resistance). A circular sectional hull was utilized which was 100-feet shorter than the Tench class and a new space-saving engine was developed the GM 16-338 "pancake" engines which could generate 1100hp. The space saved eliminated the need for one entire engine room. Additional aft torpedo stowage was eliminated and the ability to fire the Mk27 and planned Mk37 torpedoes was added. Short aft torpedo tubes were included at the request of submarine officers for use as countermeasures weapons.

By 1948, the US Navy's submarine force saw the development of a new hybrid submarine, the DFAS Diesel Fast Attack Submarines. The class was built at a length of 268 feet and a beam of 25 feet. With 2850 shaft horsepower on each of two shafts, the boat could snorkel 10,000 nautical miles at 10 knots. Underwater endurance was 43 hours at 3 knots or top speed of 17.5 knots for one hour. Diving depth was over 700 feet. These carried the WQC-2 surface search and BQA-8 navigation radars, BQG-4 active/passive sonar, and PUFFS passive sonar.

In October 1946, the design was finalized and two boats were ordered Tang (SS-563) and Trigger (SS-564). In FY1947 Wahoo (SS-565) and Trout (SS-566) were added, and in FY1948 the final two Gudgeon (SS-567) and Harder (SS-568). Construction began 1949-50 and Tang (SS-563) commissioned in 1951, the remainder in 1952.

On October 25, 1951, the second USS Tang (SS 563) was commissioned and was the first of the modern fast attack submarines and surrogate parent of the U.S. Navy's nuclear power submarine force. From its initial planning, the new Tang introduced the fast attack concept to the submarine community with its streamlined hull, integrated snorkel system, and increased speed and depth. The SS-563's design incorporated the total submerged operation concept from the U.S. Navy's World War II submarine experience as well as the submarine experience of America's enemies.

This submarine provided shipbuilders with the pattern for the first eight U.S. nuclear powered submarines of the Nautilus, Seawolf, and Skate class. Tang outlasted four of those submarines before being decommissioned. Tang quickly established itself as a submarine capable of meeting operational commitments while remaining flexible.

Keel laid down, 24 February 1949, at the Electric Boat Co., Groton, CT. Launched, 14 June 1951 Commissioned, USS Trigger (SS-564), 31 March 1952 Decommissioned, struck from the Naval Register, and transferred (sold) to Italy, under terms of the Security Assistance Program, 2 July 1973.


Gudgeon (Diesel Fast Attack) Submarine
: Ordered Fiscal Year 1948 keel laid down, 20 May 1950 at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, ME Launched, 11 June 1952 Commissioned USS Gudgeon (SS-567) on 21 November 1952.

Initially based at Pearl Harbor, she operated in Pacific waters with regular deployments to the Far East as a unit of the U. S. Seventh Fleet. Between 8 July 1957 and 21 February 1958, Gudgeon made a 25,000 cruise from Pearl Harbor to Pearl Harbor - the first United States submarine to circumnavigate the globe. On 9 December 1963, she entered Mare Island Naval Shipyard at Vallejo, CA to have her hull extended between 15 - 18 feet to accommodate the Passive Underwater Fire-Control Feasibility System (PUFFS).

Re-Designated as an Auxiliary Research Submarine (AGSS-567) on 1 April 1979 and re-designated later as an Guided Missile Auxiliary Submarine (SSAG-567) on 5 November 1979.

By the end, Tang measured more than 292 feet in length and displaced more than 2,000 tons, making it 600 tons heavier and more than 22 feet longer than the boat that slid into the New Hampshire waters in 1951.

In 1972, Tang 's crew found their boat and themselves in a new homeport San Diego, and with a new mission: antisubmarine warfare (ASW) research and training. The new job brought with it a new designation "AGSS" for the 563. Under a heavy operational tempo, Tang dedicated itself to ASW training and several special CNO research and development projects for the next six years. But in 1978, Tang shifted homeports once again. This time it went to New London, Conn., where the 563 was redesignated SS" and became the only operational diesel submarine in the Atlantic Fleet and was once again heavily used in ASW training.

The slogan "Diesel Boats Forever" seems dated now, but the diehard diesel submariners won't let it die. Nevertheless, the era of diesel-electric submarines has drawn to a close. Only their contributions in war and peace and the men who served on them are their legacy as the nuclear-powered submarine has emerged as the future of the U.S. Navy's submarine force.

Trigger (SS-564) and Harder (SS-568) were decommissioned in 1973 and transferred to Italy. The remainder were withdrawn from service 1978-83. Gudgeon (SS-567) was sold to Turkey in 1987.


Watch the video: USS Bluegill SS-242 tied up to pier at Saigon. HD Stock Footage (August 2022).